Valmynd Leit

Ašalerindi Nįmstefna

Teaching writing, inspiring writers
Sue Ellis, professor of education við University of Strathclyde í Glasgow (sue.ellis@strath.ac.uk)

SECurriculum frameworks for teaching children to write often find it difficult to capture socially orientated approaches and therefore can be dominated by the technical knowledge and skills children need to develop.  Yet writing is inherently social. Without a social purpose driving writing activities, the writing curriculum is reduced to a list of technical skills and knowledge that young children must master. Getting the balance between the social and technical aspects of writing is important.  Successful writers from the very beginning need to be encouraged to see why writing matters, and they need to be enthusiastic and confident about writing if they are to master the technical aspects. This lecture will explore the range of practical activities that can show young children how writing can be an aid to thinking, to remembering and to communicating their ideas. 

Sue Ellis researches how literacy research, policy and implementation interact with, and impact on, teacher development and pupil learning. She has a strong commitment to knowledge exchange and to research that directly supports improved literacy outcomes for pupils through the development of better policy and practice. The recurring themes in her work concern literacy and social justice, policy implementation, teacher development, and effective knowledge mobilization.

Glærur

 


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